Monthly Speaker Series

Filtering by: Monthly Speaker Series
Michael Stocker, "Evidence of Synchronous Chorusing in North Atlantic Minke Whales"
Oct
23
7:00 PM19:00

Michael Stocker, "Evidence of Synchronous Chorusing in North Atlantic Minke Whales"

Join us for a fascinating presentation by Michael Stocker, Executive Director of Ocean Conservation Research, as he brings us into the world of North Atlantic minke whale vocalizations. 

Many rorqual (blue, fin, sei, Brydes, and minke whales) communicate with pulses in the low and infrasonic frequency ranges. Research suggests that minke whales synchronize their pulsing with others, forming a chorus. Michael will introduce us to how this was discovered and why minke whales might be communicating in this manner.

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Josh McInnes, "The Ecology of Bigg's Killer Whales"
Mar
26
7:00 PM19:00

Josh McInnes, "The Ecology of Bigg's Killer Whales"

Join ACS San Francisco Bay Chapter for a fascinating evening discussing Bigg’s killer whales with Josh McInnes, Research Coordinator at Marine Life Studies.

In the eastern North Pacific three ecotypes of killer whale have been identified: residents, Transient, and offshore. Transient killer whales are apex predators that specialize in foraging for marine mammals. This specialization shapes all aspects of their ecology, from foraging, acoustics, social structure, and genetics! Transient killer whales are distributed from Southern California to the Bering Sea, with many sub-populations being socially and geographically
distinct.

In recent years with changes in ocean ecosystems, there has been an increased interest in understanding how transient killer whales affect prey both directly and indirectly.

Join Josh as he outlines the natural history and ecology of transient killer whales in the eastern North Pacific.

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Michelle Modest, "Examining Southern Hemisphere Humpback Whale Migratory Routes from Foraging to Breeding Grounds"
May
28
7:00 PM19:00

Michelle Modest, "Examining Southern Hemisphere Humpback Whale Migratory Routes from Foraging to Breeding Grounds"

Join ACS San Francisco Bay Chapter for a fascinating presentation by Michelle Modest.  

Southern hemisphere humpback whale populations spend a large portion of the year breeding in tropical waters and migrating up to 11,706 miles between this region and their summer feeding grounds in the Antarctic. Despite this impressive feat, minimal information is known about their migratory journeys. Michelle will share the findings of the first study to examine humpback whale migratory routes from foraging to breeding grounds and will explain how this information will be used to create a comprehensive overview of migratory behaviors and characteristics.

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Marcy Rustad, "Think Beyond Plastic"
Sep
25
7:00 PM19:00

Marcy Rustad, "Think Beyond Plastic"

Join ACS San Francisco Bay for an inspiring presentation by Marcy Rustad, Chief Operating Officer of Think Beyond Plastic™, and Director of the New Plastics Economy Innovation Center.

Since 2009, Think Beyond Plastic has led the shift away from fossil fuel-based plastics towards bio-based, bio-benign materials from renewable sources and associated manufacturing, and innovative consumer and business products specifically designed to handle these new materials.

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Ted Cheeseman, "Sharing the Science: How 2000 Whale Watchers are Doing What Researchers Can’t (Afford to) Do"
Aug
21
7:00 PM19:00

Ted Cheeseman, "Sharing the Science: How 2000 Whale Watchers are Doing What Researchers Can’t (Afford to) Do"

ACS San Francisco Bay Chapter presents Ted Cheeseman, "Sharing the Science: How 2000 Whale Watchers are Doing What Researchers Can’t (Afford to) Do"

There’s something amazing happening across the Pacific Ocean: every single humpback whale swimming in waters accessible by tour vessels may soon be identified as an individual and tracked. A growing team of citizen scientists collaborating with researchers through the web platform Happywhale have now identified over 15,000 individuals from the Antarctic to Alaska. Suddenly, whale science has become personal, accessible, and hopefully, more powerful. With this, we are more quickly identifying entangled whales, learning if individuals who have suffered entanglements survive. We are also better understanding whale migration patterns.  Join us to enjoy stories and images from an inspiring movement in citizen science.

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Dr. Shawn Johnson, The Marine Mammal Center Director of Veterinary Science: “Not Just Seizing Sea Lions: How Domoic Acid is Impacting Southern Sea Otters”
Jul
31
7:00 PM19:00

Dr. Shawn Johnson, The Marine Mammal Center Director of Veterinary Science: “Not Just Seizing Sea Lions: How Domoic Acid is Impacting Southern Sea Otters”

Join ACS - San Francisco Chapter for an inspiring presentation by Dr. Shawn Johnson, Director of Veterinary Science at The Marine Mammal Center.

The Marine Mammal Center recently rescued and rehabilitated two adult sea otters exhibiting neurological signs attributed to domoic acid toxicosis. These are the first otters known to be diagnosed and treated for this disease. This talk will detail the otter’s rescue, rehabilitation, and new post-release monitoring technology which will allow us to better understand the long-term effects of domoic acid on individual sea otters and the population.

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ACS San Francisco Chapter Grant Awardees Kaytlin Ingman & Samantha Jane Cope
May
22
7:00 PM19:00

ACS San Francisco Chapter Grant Awardees Kaytlin Ingman & Samantha Jane Cope

ACS SF Chapter Grant Awardees Kaytlin Ingman and Samantha Jane Cope will share their latest research findings with us. Jane Cope will present “Evaluating the influence of vessel noise on the underwater soundscape of San Francisco Bay.” Kaytlin Ingman will present “Long Term Trends in Baleen Whale Observations Near the Farallon Islands.” Open to the public, free of charge.

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Scott Benson: "Leatherback Sea Turtles in the California Current: Why Leatherbacks Cross the Pacific"
Apr
24
7:00 PM19:00

Scott Benson: "Leatherback Sea Turtles in the California Current: Why Leatherbacks Cross the Pacific"

  • US Army Corps of Engineers Bay Model Visitor Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

With their immense size and peculiar appearance, leatherback turtles resemble species that inhabited Earth in the distant past. A swimming and diving machine, they are uniquely adapted for life at sea. This ancient mariner is the most widely distributed sea turtle, spanning tropical and subarctic waters worldwide. The endangered western Pacific leatherback turtle engages in the longest migration of any aquatic, air-breathing vertebrate. These turtles travel more than 7,000 miles annually between their western Pacific nesting beaches and their eastern Pacific foraging areas. The presentation will cover the biology and ecology of leatherback turtles, the current status of the population, challenges to recovery, and the actions we can take to help.

Scott Benson. Research Fishery Biologist, NOAA – Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Marine Turtle Ecology and Assessment Program

Scott Benson MSC is a marine ecologist with extensive at-sea research experience throughout the world’s oceans. Stationed at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, he is co-investigator of the SWFSC’s leatherback turtle ecology program and coordinates research on leatherbacks in central California and the Western Pacific. His education includes a B.A. from San Diego State University and an M.S. in Marine Science from Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. Since 1985, Scott’s research projects have included integrated studies of marine mammals, seabirds and leatherback turtles, with emphasis on abundance, distribution, ecology, and oceanographic patterns influencing the occurrence of these species. Scott has designed, coordinated, and analyzed results from ongoing surveys of marine birds and mammals in Monterey Bay , including collaborative at-sea ecosystem studies. He also coordinated a Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary program to monitor beach deposition rates of marine vertebrates. Results from these studies have successfully documented natural and anthropogenic impacts on seabirds and marine mammals. Recent field work has included systematic aerial surveys for leatherbacks and marine mammals in central California; telemetry studies of North Pacific leatherbacks tagged at-sea in central California, and on nesting beaches in Papua New Guinea and Papua, Indonesia; capacity building and nesting beach research in the western Pacific; and habitat studies of central California foraging grounds. 

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Heirs to Our Oceans
Mar
27
7:00 PM19:00

Heirs to Our Oceans

Heirs To Our Oceans are youth leaders who are dedicated to inspire awareness, responsibility and action amongst youth worldwide to protect the waters of our Blue Planet for future generations.  They empower youth, supporting them in their education and engagement in tackling human impact on our planet.  They are active in the world making change and protecting our oceans through beach clean ups, speaking engagements, political action and more.  The Heirs make every effort to help adults understand that their daily actions affect the oceans and health of their children.

The Heirs work to encourage parents, educators and policy makers to teach youth starting in middle school about real-world problems so that they may develop essential problem-solving skills to prepare them for the world they will inherit.  The Heirs also advocate for children to spend more time in their natural environment — in water! — because one protects what one cares about.

Finally, Heirs foster hope, optimism and the continued processing of creative solutionsin solving the ocean crisis.  Heirs To Our Oceans is creating the next

generation of environmental leaders.   They are unstoppable because they have to be.

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Dr. Baldo B. Marinovic: "Krill: More Than Just Food For Whales"
Jan
30
7:00 PM19:00

Dr. Baldo B. Marinovic: "Krill: More Than Just Food For Whales"

ACS San Francisco Chapter presents: Dr. Baldo B. Marinovic: “Krill: More Than Just food For Whales”

Dr. Baldo Marinovic, a research biologist at Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz studies zooplankton ecology and the dynamics of ocean food webs. MS Marine sciences UCSC, PhD Zoology University Western Australia. This presentation will explore the natural history of krill within the Central California Coastal ecosystem in an attempt to highlight their importance with respect to the overall health of this ecosystem. This event is open to the public and is free of charge.

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